get to know me meme (royalist edition) || (2/5) royal films or television shows: The Young Victoria (2009)

I am young, but I am willing to learn, and I mean to devote my life to the service of my country and my people. I look for your help in this. I know I shall not be disappointed. Thank you.


historyofromanovs:

The Ballroom of Catherine Palace, Tsarskoe Selo, Russia
Source

historyofromanovs:

The Ballroom of Catherine Palace, Tsarskoe Selo, Russia

Source


tiny-librarian:

And so, on an October morning in 1966, Suzanne and I walked into Yale’s Beinecke Rare Books and Manuscript Library. We met Miss Wynne and filled out the required forms. Soon, from behind closed doors, a small, rolling table was wheeled in, laden with six fat albums in cloth and leather, all peeling and cracking at the edges. We opened the first album. Here were photographs of an Edwardian family in the lighter moments of life. But, incredibly, they were not just any Edwardian family; they were the Russian Imperial family, which a few years later would be obliterated in the revolution that obliterated so much of the life and culture of Old Russia. Turning the pages, we found hundreds of pictures, collectively confirming the millions of words I had read about the life of this couple and their children. It was an extraordinary collection: the most complete set of intimate photographs of the Imperial family to survive the holocaust of the revolution. Not only had most images of this kind been lost, scattered, or confiscated during the revolution itself, but afterwards there were stories of attempts by Soviet agents to locate, remove, and destroy from all public and commercial archives any photographs depicting the last Tsar and his family as normal human beings whose faces and activities might arouse a shred of interest or sympathy.

The Romanov Family Album - Introductory text by Robert K. Massie


antique-royals:

ALEJANDRA FEODOROVNA by the lost gallery on Flickr.

antique-royals:

ALEJANDRA FEODOROVNA by the lost gallery on Flickr.


It was our destiny to love and say goodbye.



Anonymous asked: Hey! Lovely blog you have :D I've been seeing so many wonderful Romanov AUs around that got me thinking about the real prospects for the girls in different circumstances. Are there any matches you consider that could have happened for them? Surely their marriages would be a matter of huge importance and it's intriguing to imagine the scenarios... Thanks in advance!

bulletproofjewels:

Thank you!
The AUs break my heart *sobs*
The marriages of OTMA would have depended whether AU means they survived or AU as in the war never occured. Had it not occurred, they most certainly would have married royalty, even with the fact Nicholas and Alix wanted them to marry for love as they had. The 1920s would have been a decade for marriages in the RIF, as that entire generation was at marriageable age at that time.

  • I think Olga is the most difficult to place, as she stated constantly she wished to remain in Russia. Perhaps one of the Konstantinovich princes? I would have thought Prince John would have made Olga a suitable husband but he married in 1911. His brother Prince Konstantine had a crush on Olga at one point, and I think he could have also made a good match.
  • Tatiana I will ALWAYS maintain would have become a Queen. She just glowed with majesty, and her personality in childhood of the governess would have made her a perfect democratic monarch. I think she would have suited perhaps the future (briefly) Edward VIII. Imagine the BRF these days if David had not abdicated and ruled with Tatya at his side. *clutches heart*
  • Maria, I will say this a million times, I have always paired with Louis Mountbatten, who had her photo by his bed for the rest of his life. Though that AU would HAVE to include a happy ending for poor Dickie :(
  • Anastasia is the exception to the royal marriage rule. I could see her marrying a commoner, like her aunt Olga and uncle Michael. I think Nicholas and Alexandra would have certainly been concerned for the two eldest daughters, but Anastasia’s willful spirit and rebellion would have allowed her to have her own way in marriage.

- Becky



"It was not long before Sydney Gibbes found himself once more having to contend with Anastasia’s quirky and inattentive behaviour in class. On one occasion, having lost his temper, he told her to ‘shut up’; the next time she handed in her homework she had added a new nameplate to her exercise book – ‘A. Romanova (Shut up!)’."

— Helen Rappaport, The Romanov Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Daughters of Nicholas and Alexandra (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2014): p. 335.




Miniature of Maria and Anastasia from the Fabrege 1915 egg

Miniature of Maria and Anastasia from the Fabrege 1915 egg


memory-of-the-romanovs:

The White Army - the informal name of the military-political groups who fought in the Civil War against the Soviets. Emerged after the abdication of Emperor Nicholas II in 1917. Origin of the term associated with the traditional symbols of the white color as the supporters of the “lawful order. Basis White Guard - the officers of the tsarist army; leadership - military tops (M.V. Alekseev, P.N. Wrangel, A. I. Denikin, A. V. Kolchak, L.G. Kornilov, Y. K. Miller, N.N. Yudenitch). Arose under the banner of the national salvation and restoration of statehood, which would entail the return and recovery of lost power, socio-economic rights and relations, market economy and reunion with the lost areas of the Russian Empire.

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romanovdreams:

Princess Elisabeth of Hesse and Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich in 1884, the year of their marriage.

romanovdreams:

Princess Elisabeth of Hesse and Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich in 1884, the year of their marriage.


romanovdreams:

Tsarevna Maria Feodorovna and her eldest son Nicholas Alexandrovich, 1871.

romanovdreams:

Tsarevna Maria Feodorovna and her eldest son Nicholas Alexandrovich, 1871.


memory-of-the-romanovs:

Романовы. Венценосная семья” (2000).

"The story of the tragic death of the last Russian Emperor and his family unravels during the period from February 1917 to July 1918. Nicholas II never had a personal desire to be in power, but became an Emperor due to the laws of succession to the throne. Being a complete stranger to the idea of revolution, he involuntary became its co-author. This is the essence of his personal tragedy, which became a tragedy of his family and his people. However, he has found his genuine greatness as a simple family man, once the burden of power was off." (x)

"Romanovs. The Imperial Family" | Russia | 135 min | Vera Film,  Federal agency of culture and cinematography | Director - Gleb Panfilov.


juaniandtheroyals:

Favourite Celebrity Meme: [1/4] Favourite Photos Over All → Wedding to Prince Willem-Alexander, 2002

juaniandtheroyals:

Favourite Celebrity Meme: [1/4] Favourite Photos Over All → Wedding to Prince Willem-Alexander, 2002


{make me choose} ♔
giftedfool asked: empress eugenie or empress of mexico?

The Last Empress of France was born into a Spanish noble family on 5 May 1826. Eugénie was formally educated mostly in Paris. A school report praised her strong liking for athletic exercise, and although an indifferent student, that her character was “good, generous, active and firm.” A short, disastrous stay, in 1837, in a boarding school near Bristol, England, where she was known as “Carrots”, for her auburn hair, and from which she tried to run away, to India, completed Eugénie’s formal schooling. However, most of her education took place at home, under the tutelage of English governesses.

In 1849, Eugénie first met Prince Louis Napoléon after he had become president of the Second Republic, with her mother. The couple wed, on 29 January 1853, in a civil ceremony at the Tuileries, and on the 30th there was a much grander religious ceremony at Notre Dame. Eugénie found childbearing extraordinarily difficult. An initial miscarriage in 1853, after a three month pregnancy, frightened and soured her. On 16 March 1856, after a two-day labor that endangered mother and child and from which Eugénie made a very slow recovery, the empress gave birth to an only son, Napoléon Eugène Louis Jean Joseph Bonaparte, styled Prince Impérial, who was tragically killed in the Anglo-Zuzu War.

Her husband often consulted her on important questions, and she acted as Regent during his absences in 1859, 1865 and 1870. A Catholic and a conservative, her influence countered any liberal tendencies in the emperor’s policies. When the Second French Empire was overthrown after France’s defeat in the Franco-Prussian War (1870–71), the empress and her husband took refuge in England, and settled at Chislehurst, Kent. After the deaths of her husband and son, as her health started to deteriorate, she spent some time at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight. The former empress died in July 1920, aged 94, during a visit to her relative the Duke of Alba, at the Liria Palace in Madrid in her native Spain.